10 Comments
Jan 29Liked by Parker Molloy

Couple (few?) decades of having "WAKE UP, SHEEPLE!!!" shouted across the airwaves, but now that people are more awake and having empathy for people-not-like-me, we are accused of having a brain virus and shouted down. "Competition is the law of the jungle, but cooperation is the law of civilization." --attributed to Pyotr Kropotkin.

Expand full comment
Jan 29Liked by Parker Molloy

Hi Parker, just wanted to say that I went from free to paid today! Your writing has been incredibly illuminating during this time of flux. It is more important now than ever to be supporting journalism with integrity.

Expand full comment
Jan 29Liked by Parker Molloy

I remember once hearing on a podcast about the role newspaper and magazine editors used to play in providing readers with a curated overview of what was going on in the world. In the social media age, the culture has largely turned against such gatekeepers. On the one hand, this has allowed more diverse voices to access microphones, but on the other hand, it's easier for people to silo themselves off and only pay attention to what they want to pay attention. Seeing you increasingly bringing other writers and newsletters into The Present Age, I'm wondering if this could be a transition from a strict writer role to more of a writer-editor/curator role.

Anyhow, I'm off to read that Plat Was a Dick post.

Expand full comment

Thanks for all the work you do, keeping up with all this stuff (which must also be very difficult not to be constantly either enraged or in despair.) I really appreciate it.

Expand full comment
Jan 29Liked by Parker Molloy

I've had a lot of thoughts about the New York Times recently, but they might illustrate some broader issues. Their framing and bias is sometimes so opaque that their reporting becomes untrustworthy because it feels like you have to Google every person interviewed and annotate each piece for yourself. For example, much of their reporting on anti-trans initiatives has left out crucial context about who the players are. It feels like you need a trustworthy expert to help you make decode the reporting.

I subscribe to a ton of newsletters and independent media because I know where the writers stand and can understand how that plays into their analysis. Legacy media's insistence on upholding the fiction of the "view from nowhere" makes it feel illegible.

Another thought is that the editorial side of news publications should become a separate entity. I don't see any value in bundling together whoever the business owners decided into give a column to under the brand of a newspaper. Once upon a time, the newspaper may have been a crucial platform for opinions, but now it just like another way to alienate readers and create backlash.

Expand full comment

Glad to be a paid subscriber, but this post did get me thinking about my limit. I pay for 4 newsletters, and I am prepared to go to 6 because 2 free newsletters might switch to paid. But there has to be a limit. Wouldn't it be great if there was one fee to get lots of good writers that had ethical standards and was invested in the truth? In the meantime, I'm glad to support writers directly.

Also, I misread the headline to this piece twice. First I read it (on my phone email subject line - which is small, ok) as "Is Tinkerbell Gay" which I thought was sort of weird, but I was making my kid's breakfast and didn't open it right away. Then I looked at it again and read it as "Is Tinkerbell Job" like the biblical character. I thought, wow, I'm going to need to read this sitting down. Tinkerbell as the focus of God's abandonment. Ok. I wasn't exactly disappointed to realize the piece was about your job - but it was different than I expected.

Expand full comment